Child Poverty

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GMPA joins calls for national action on poverty

By Graham Whitham

Even before the devastating impact of Covid-19 on household incomes, child poverty has been rising rapidly in some of the poorest communities in Britain, leaving growing numbers of children cut adrift and ill equipped to cope with the impact of the pandemic.

As a member of the End Child Poverty Coalition, GMPA is joining calls on the Government to take seriously the four year rise in child poverty and to commit to an ambitious and comprehensive strategy to end child poverty in the UK as it plans the nation’s recovery from Coronavirus.

New analysis of government poverty data undertaken by Loughborough University, on behalf of the End Child Poverty Coalition (ECP), tracks four years of child poverty across Britain before housing costs are taken into account (2014/15 – 2018/19). The analysis highlights those parts of the country where children are most likely to have been swept into poverty since 2014.

The research shows that the North West of England experienced the third highest increase in child poverty between 2014/15 to 2018/19 (see table 1), and that the largest increases in child poverty happened in already deprived areas. Among Greater Manchester’s ten local authorities, Oldham saw the largest increases in child poverty as it rose from 28.7% to 38% (see table 2). Stockport and Trafford were the only Greater Manchester boroughs to experiences increases in child poverty lower than the increase across the country as a whole.

Table 1 Change in child poverty by region 2014/15 to 2018/19

RegionChild poverty rate 2014/15Child poverty rate 2018/19% point increase
NORTH EAST17.3%23.7%6.5%
WEST MIDLANDS19.1%23.8%4.7%
NORTH WEST18.5%23.0%4.5%
YORKSHIRE AND HUMBERSIDE19.2%23.4%4.2%
SCOTLAND14.5%18.1%3.6%
LONDON14.2%17.5%3.4%
SOUTH EAST10.8%13.7%2.9%
EAST13.1%15.4%2.2%
EAST MIDLANDS16.6%16.6%0.0%
WALES18.4%18.1%-0.2%
SOUTH WEST15.0%13.4%-1.6%

The pandemic has underlined the need for urgent action to address child poverty. Recent ONS analysis, carried out 17-27 April 2020, found that 23% of adults said the coronavirus was affecting their household finances. The most common impact in this group was reduced income (70%), and nearly half saying they had needed to use savings or borrow to cover living costs. A number of announcements over the last month or so will be helping some people. The government’s furlough scheme and increase in support through Universal Credit and Working Tax Credit will help. Although welcome, these measures are unlikely to be enough to stop the pandemic pushing many households into financial hardship, either in the short or long-term.

There are additional measures GMPA would like to see, and we have been adding our voice to national campaigns calling for changes which include:

  • Substantially increasing Child Benefit. This is the quickest and most efficient means of getting extra money into the pockets of families;
  • Ending the two-child limit that restricts benefit payments to the first two children in the household;
  • Scrapping the benefit cap that limits the total amount of support a household can receive through the benefit system; and
  • Providing extra funding towards council’s local welfare assistance schemes so that they can meet the extra demand for support over the coming weeks and months.

Table 2 Percent of children in households below 60% median, before housing costs,
by local authority 2014/15 to 2018/19

2014/152018/19Percentage point increase,
2014/15 to 2018/19
Oldham28.7%38.0%9.3%
Bolton24.8%32.2%7.4%
Manchester27.8%33.6%5.8%
Tameside19.4%24.7%5.3%
Rochdale25.3%30.2%4.9%
Bury18.2%22.9%4.7%
Wigan16.6%20.2%3.6%
Salford20.7%24.0%3.3%
GB Total15.6%18.4%2.8%
Stockport12.6%15.2%2.6%
Trafford11.1%12.8%1.7%

 

For the full report from ECP, please go to the website

i3oz9sChild Poverty