GM Mini Poverty Monitor

GMPA has produced a GM Mini Poverty Monitor detailing some of the key statistics relating to poverty across the city region. Data is provided either at a Greater Manchester level and/or a local authority level (detailing statistics for each of the ten GM boroughs).

The aim of the mini monitor is to provide a snapshot of poverty in Greater Manchester and how different areas compare. Each graph provides a link through to the original data source, allowing the user to find out more and make comparisons between GM and other parts of the country. The page is broken down into seven sections: Child poverty, Housing, The labour market, Social security, Education, Health and Fuel poverty, food poverty and the poverty premium. You can jump straight to individual charts using the links below. The monitor is not an exhaustive list, but a snapshot of key indicators we know are of interest to members of our network.

If you would like to access data at a more local level (e.g. ward or lower super output area level), we would encourage you to look at the MappingGm tool created by the Greater Manchester Combined Authority and Salford City Council.

The data presented on this page was gathered in June 2019. Some of the data is updated regularly and we encourage users to go to the original data source to identify whether more up-to-date data is available.

You can download the GMPA press statement we released to coincide with the launch of the mini monitor here.

If you have any comments about the data on this page please contact us by email . GMPA is keen on developing a more comprehensive poverty monitor in the future. Please contact us if this is something you could support us with.

Child poverty

This chart looks at Child Poverty levels in Greater Manchester in 2017/18. The method used for this data is available here. Child poverty is represented both before housing costs (BHC) and after housing costs (AHC) in this chart. As with other parts of the country, child poverty measured AHC tends to be higher, underlining the impact of housing costs on the living standards of children. Anti-poverty campaigners tend to refer to AHC figures as this better reflects the true extent of poverty in the UK.

You can access ward level figures and compare child poverty levels in Greater Manchester with others parts of the country here.

Out of the 10 local authorities in Greater Manchester, child poverty is highest in Manchester and lowest in Stockport and Trafford.

Table 1: Showing the highest and lowest ward child poverty rates in each Greater Manchester borough in 2018

BoroughHighestPer cent in poverty AHCLowestPer cent in poverty AHC
BoltonGreat Lever55%Bromley Cross18.5%
BurySedgley50.4%Tottington19.2%
ManchesterLongsight59.5%Chorlton23.6%
OldhamWerneth66.2%Saddleworth North19.1%
RochdaleCentral Rochdale57.4%Norden23.2%
SalfordOrdsall59.3%Worsley13.4%
StockportBrinnington and Central42.8%Bramhall South14.3%
TamesideSt Peters52%Denton West23.1%
TraffordClifford48.2%Timperley15.2%
WiganInce42.9%Winstanley15.4%

Source: http://www.endchildpoverty.org.uk/poverty-in-your-area-2019/

Table 1 shows the highest and lowest ward child poverty rate (after housing costs) in each Greater Manchester borough. The ward with the highest rate in the whole of Greater Manchester is Werneth in Oldham at 66.2% and the ward with the lowest is Worsley in Salford at 13.4%.

Housing

This chart shows how private rents vary by local authority area in Greater Manchester and how much rent costs represents in terms of earnings per borough. This is an important indicator of housing affordability in an area.

The bars show monthly rent levels based on two-bedroom properties and the line represents the percentage of this indexed on lower quartile monthly gross earnings. It is based on Private rental market statistics 2017-2018 and ASHE 2017/18, ONS.

In 2017-2018 the highest monthly average rent was found in Manchester with £675 per month and Trafford at £695. The lowest rent in Greater Manchester can be found in Wigan and Rochdale with an average of £425 per month for a 2-bedroom property.

Rent for a two-bedroom property in Manchester represents more than 56% of the revenue of the lower quartile monthly gross earnings – higher than any other area. The rest of the local authorities display a ratio rent/earnings oscillating between 35 and 49 percent.

The labour market


The chart above represents the unemployment rate for each local authority in Greater Manchester between 2005-2018. The most recent peak in unemployment occurred in Manchester between 2011 and 2012 with 12.9% of the population aged 16+ experiencing unemployment. The two local authorities which had the lowest rates of unemployment at any given time are Tameside and Trafford. On the other hand, Manchester, Salford, Rochdale and Oldham consistently maintained higher unemployment levels than other boroughs.

Since 2011-2012, unemployment has steadily decreased across Greater Manchester as a whole, with the highest rates of unemployment being in Bolton and Oldham. The two local authorities which had the lowest rate of unemployment at any given time are Stockport and Trafford.


The chart above shows the number of unemployed men and women across the whole of Greater Manchester over time. In 2017-2018 there were about 60.000 people unemployed in Greater Manchester, the lowest level since 2005-2006. Out of the 60.000, 28.600 were women and 32.800 were men. A net decrease in male unemployment is notable when comparing it to the previous years.

Table 2: Showing the number and proportion of workers paid at the National Living Wage(NLW)/National Minimum Wage(NMW) or below in each Greater Manchester borough in 2018

 Number paid at or below the NLW/NMWPer cent paid at or below the NLW/NMW
Rochdale8,00012.2
Wigan11,80012.0
Tameside5,70010.7
Oldham7,2009.6
Bolton9,4009.5
Bury4,7008.3
Stockport9,1008.0
Trafford6,9006.2
Manchester20,3006.1
Salford5,1004.5

Source: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/national-minimum-wage-low-pay-commission-2018-report

Table 2 shows the number and proportion of working people age 16 and above being paid at or below the National Living Wage (NLW) and National Minimum Wage (NMW). The prevalence of low paying work is a major problem in Greater Manchester.  Rochdale has the highest rate of workers paid at or below the statutory minimum at 12.2%.

NB: The data shows the local authority where individuals work not where they live.


The chart above shows the proportion of population earnings divided in percentile of real gross earnings in 2008 and 2018 in Great Britain and in Greater Manchester. This graph includes all types of employees. In 2018, 50% of the population were earning £435 or less in Greater Manchester, compared to £373.70 or less 10 years prior. At each percentile earnings are lower in Greater Manchester compare to Great Britain as a whole.

Table 3: Showing the average hourly pay rate for full-time workers (excluding overtime) by place of residence in each Greater Manchester borough in 2018

 Hourly pay rate for full-time workers (excluding overtime) by place of residence
Oldham£11.85
Tameside£11.88
Bolton£12.21
Salford£12.26
Rochdale£12.32
Manchester£12.78
Wigan£13.22
Bury£13.83
Great Britain£14.36
Greater Manchester£13.04
Stockport£14.58
Trafford£17.18

Source: https://www.nomisweb.co.uk/

Table 3 shows the average hourly pay rate for full-time workers in each Greater Manchester borough in 2018. This varies considerably across the city region, with people who work full-time and live in Trafford earning £17.18, comfortably above the Great Britain average, compared to full-time workers in Oldham who earn an average of £11.85 per hour.

NB: The data is for workers by place of residence not where their job is located.

Social security

Source: https://www.nomisweb.co.uk/

This chart shows the proportion of working age adults claiming out-of-work benefits in each of the ten boroughs over-time. Whilst the claimant rates vary between the boroughs, the general trend across each of the local authorities shows a consistent pattern since 2008. Trafford and Stockport have maintained a claimant rate in line with or below the rate for Great Britain as a whole, whilst the other eight boroughs have consistently experienced a higher rate.


This chart shows the number of housing benefits claimants in each borough in November 2018. Most notably, in November 2018, 48.756 claimants were registered in Manchester alone. Salford registered 23.323 claimants in the same period. The local authorities with the lowest number of claimants was Bury (10.602) and Trafford (9.829).

This chart shows Housing benefit claimants only and not recipients of the housing element of Universal Credit.


This chart shows the number of people on Universal Credit in each of the ten Greater Manchester boroughs. Universal Credit is not being rolled out evenly across Greater Manchester or across the country as a whole. The graph helps to illustrate the extent to which the system is in operation in different parts of the city region.


This chart shows the changes in the number of people in receipt of Universal Credit over time in Greater Manchester as a whole, and indicates where across the city region claimants are located. With the progressive rollout of Universal Credit, Greater Manchester has seen a sharp increase in the number of beneficiaries since 2015. The two local authorities which have seen a high increase in UC claimants are Oldham and Manchester.

This chart shows sanctions over time in Greater Manchester by benefit type.

Benefits sanctions in Greater Manchester have greatly reduced over the last 5 years, especially in terms of sanctions against those claiming Jobseeker’s Allowance (JSA). This has dropped from 13,000 to less than a thousand per month. Employment Support Allowance (ESA) sanctions have fallen from around 1,000 sanctions a month to less than 500 per month. On the other hand, UC sanctions on the month of their rollout started at more than 2.500 sanctions, increased to 4,000 in October 2017 and have been falling since to less than 1.000.

Education


This chart shows the proportion of students achieving 5+ A*-C GCSEs at the end of Key Stage 4 in each of the 10 local authorities in Greater Manchester from 2005/06 through 2017/2018. From 2005/2006 until 2011-2012 – 2012/2013, educational attainment at the GCSE level steadily improved. Over the past 5 years the trend has been more mixed.

It should be noted that there were methodological changes in 2013/2014 which has effected the rates. However, linking data prior to the methodological changes with the data after still helps paint an accurate image of the current trends in GCSE attainment.

An outliner to the whole trend observable over time in Greater Manchester is Trafford which has consistently had a higher number of pupils achieving 5+ A*-C GCSEs. Trafford schools tend to attract some of the high-attaining pupils from surrounding Las in part due to the presence of grammar schools. However, not unlike other LAs, Trafford has seen a notable dip in the numbers of pupils achieving 5+ A*-C GCSEs between 2015-2016 through 2017/2018.

This chart shows the proportion of children achieving at least expected levels across all early years learning goals both across England and each borough in Greater Manchester.

Across both England and Greater Manchester, the percentage of girls achieving at least expected levels across all early years learning goals is much higher than boys.

The area where girls and boys are most ready to attend school in terms of learning goals is Trafford where 81.5% of girls and 67.3% of boys in age to attend school are properly ready to do so. There is still an important disparity between both genders. The local authority where children are the least prepared to attend school is Oldham: 68.7% of girls and 54.3% of boys.


This chart shows the number of adults lacking level 3 qualifications (equivalent to ‘A’ level) by each Greater Manchester borough, both in terms of population and its representation in percentage ratio against the rest of the population.

In terms of population ratio, the worst performing local authority is Oldham with 33.1% of adults living in the borough lacking level 3 qualifications. Trafford is the local authority with the lowest proportion of adults lacking level 3 qualifications – 17.8% of the total adult population lack level 3 qualifications.

Health


This chart shows the life expectancy of men in Greater Manchester. The life expectancy over Greater Manchester has markedly increased since 1991. In 2012-2014, the lowest life expectancy for men was recorded in Manchester with an average life expectancy of 75.8 years at birth. The highest life expectancy averaged was recorded in Stockport and Trafford which reached 79.5 years at birth.


This chart shows the life expectancy of women in Greater Manchester. The life expectancy over Greater Manchester has markedly increased since 1991. In 2012-2014, the lowest life expectancy for women was recorded in Manchester with an average life expectancy of 79.9 years at birth. The highest life expectancy averaged was recorded in Stockport (83) and Trafford (83.7).

Fuel poverty, food poverty and the poverty premium

This chart shows the proportion of households experiencing fuel poverty by each Greater Manchester local authority. Manchester has the highest rate of fuel poverty at 16%. Fuel poverty across Greater Manchester affects 10.7% of the households.

Figure 1 Showing the number of foodbanks, food clubs and other food providers in Greater Manchester by local authority area

Food providers in GM

Source: https://www.gmpovertyaction.org/maps/

GMPA’s map of food providers in Greater Manchester shows that food banks and other initiatives aimed at supporting people experiencing poverty are more heavily concentrated in certain parts of the city region. Figure 1 shows the location of foodbanks identified by GMPA and the boundaries of each of the ten Greater Manchester boroughs. This shows that there are more than 50 foodbanks located in Manchester compared to less than 10 foodbanks in each of Rochdale and Bury. It should be noted that whilst this map shows the location of foodbanks in Greater Manchester, it doesn’t show location of the people that they support. Some foodbanks support people from multiple local authority areas.

Our map also details food clubs and other providers of food support. To see the map in full please go to our website

Table 4: An illustration of the poverty premium in Greater Manchester 2018

 Typical costCost to low income familyDifference
Loan for £500£500£757.78£278.78
Household white goods£233.50£451.75£218.25
Annual gas and electricity bills combined£935.20£1077.83£142.63
Home contents insurance£51.46£61.33£9.87
Car insurance£505.22£973.36£468.14
Total£2225.38£3322.05£1096.67

Source: https://www.gmpovertyaction.org/poverty-premium/

Table 4 is taken from GMPA’s poverty premium research, published in November 2018. It replicates the methodology developed by Save the Children and used by researchers and campaigners on several occasions to help illustrate the potential extra costs for everyday goods and services facing low income households in the UK. This version of the illustration found that the extra costs facing a typical low-income family in Greater Manchester could amount to £1096.67.

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