GMPA

IKEA – Introducing the Living Wage

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IKEA – Introducing the Living Wage is an investment we are incredibly proud of
By Katarina Verdon Olsson, Store Manager at IKEA Manchester (Ashton-Under-Lyne)

Since IKEA became the largest accredited Real Living Wage employer in retail  in 2016, the Greater Manchester Living Wage Campaign has worked with the local store in Ashton-Under-Lyne to promote their good work, and to encourage other employers to follow in their footsteps. Here the local store manager Katarina Verdon Olsson writes about the benefits to co-workers and the business as a whole.

As a values-driven organisation, we believe in providing a meaningful wage to our co-workers that supports the cost of living and this is why we were the first large retail employer to commit to paying the Living Wage and becoming an accredited member of the Living Wage Foundation.

On 1 April 2016, IKEA UK introduced the Living Wage – as defined by the Living Wage Foundation – for all of our co-workers. Today 9,000+ co-workers of all ages across the UK benefit from earning above the statutory National Living Wage. On a local level this has impacted the lives of 300+ co-workers living and working in the Greater Manchester area at the IKEA Manchester store in Ashton-Under-Lyne.

This move was part of a wider transformation of basic co-worker conditions introduced globally by IKEA to ensure that co-workers have the right level of pay, the right contract and an appropriate schedule.

Introducing the Living Wage is an investment we are incredibly proud of, particularly as our co-workers have told us about the positive benefits this has had on their lives. Below are some stories from our co-workers working at the IKEA Manchester store who have shared how the Living Wage increase has impacted them:

“My daughter loves to dance and is passionate about many different types of dance such as ballet, tap and modern. The increase in the living wage meant that we could afford more lessons and the cost involved with performances. The extra money also meant that I could take my family on weekends away more often within the UK.”
Tim (Recovery Co-worker)

“The increase in the living wage meant I could save more money for my dream wedding in Disneyland in Florida. I had also been secretly saving for a honeymoon in the Caribbean which I surprised my girlfriend with the news before we jetted off to the US for our wedding in November last year.”
Danielle (Kitchens co-worker)

Living Wage week photo for GM Poverty Action

IKEA workers front and centre at our 2016 Living Wage Week event

Implementing the Living Wage Foundation’s recommended rates of pay is not only the right thing to do by our co-workers and our values but it also makes good business sense. As we continue to grow in the UK, motivating and retaining our co-workers, as well as attracting new co-workers, becomes increasingly important. We also believe that a team with good compensation and working conditions is in a better position to provide a great experience to our customers.

Katarina Verdon Olsson IKEA article for GM Poverty Action

Katarina Verdon Olsson

As well as being good for society, we have also seen business benefits to paying the real Living Wage. At IKEA Manchester, since adopting the Living Wage in 2016 we have not only seen a decrease in staff turnover by -12%, we have also seen the improvement in the co-worker engagement survey (+3.7%) and customer experience key performance indicators.

We encourage other businesses to explore what the benefits of paying the real Living Wage would mean for their staff, business and the Greater Manchester area.

 

 


Can you become an accredited Real Living Wage Employer? It’s easier than you may think –
please fill out this form to start the process and join over 150 Greater Manchester-based employers in committing to paying your workers enough to live on.

 

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Drop-in Timetable 2018

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Manchester  Christmas & New Year Drop-In Timetable


supplied by
Street Support logo for Xmas 2018 dropin timetable for GM Poverty Action

 


Sat 22nd Dec

Lifeshare 7am – 9am Breakfast
Reach Out To The Community 10am – 5pm Shop open. Food parcels & support
Mustard Tree 10am – 4pm Furniture, clothes, food club & food parcels
Coffee4Craig 5pm – 7pm Food, showers, advice & support

Sunday 23rd Dec
Lifeshare 7am – 9am Breakfast (Xmas Project begins 2pm – 8pm)
Food4All 4pm – 6pm Sunday roast, (veg & vegan options)

Mon 24th Dec

Lifeshare 8am – 8pm Food, entertainment, clothing, bedding, toiletries, medical care
Booth Centre 9am – 1pm Breakfast/lunch/advice/activities
Centrepoint 10am – 12pm & 1pm – 4pm Signposting
JustLife 10am – 12pm Meal & activities (Openshaw Centre, Ashton Old Road)
Mustard Tree 10am – 4pm Furniture, clothes, food club & food parcels
Cornerstones 10.30am – 3pm Hot food & drinks, shower & clothing
Reach Out To The Community 10.30am – 3pm Shop open. Food parcels & support
Urban Village 2.30pm – 4.30pm GP, nurse, drug worker and wound care clinic
MASH 10pm – 2am Mobile drop-In

Tues 25th Dec

Lifeshare 8am – 8pm Food, entertainment, clothing, bedding, toiletries, medical care
Booth Centre 9am – 1pm Breakfast/Xmas Day dinner/advice/activities
Cornerstones 10.30 – 3pm Xmas Day dinner

Wed 26th Dec

Lifeshare 8am – 8pm Food, entertainment, clothing, bedding, toiletries, medical care
Cornerstones 10.30 – 3pm Boxing Day dinner

Thurs 27th Dec

Lifeshare 8am – 8pm Food, entertainment, clothing, bedding, toiletries, medical care
Booth Centre 9am – 1pm Breakfast/lunch/advice/activities
Men’s Room 10am – 5pm (Office) 12pm -4pm (Creative session)
Mustard Tree 10am – 12.30pm Furniture, clothes, food club & food parcels
Reach Out To The Community 10am – 4pm Shop open. Food parcels & support
Cornerstones 10.30am – 3pm Hot food & drinks, shower & clothing
Urban Village 2.30pm – 4.30pm GP, nurse, drug worker and wound care clinic
Coffee4Craig 7pm – 9pm Food, showers, advice & support
MASH 8pm – 12am Mobile drop-In

Fri 28th Dec

Lifeshare 8am – 8pm Food, entertainment, clothing, bedding, toiletries, medical care
Booth Centre 9am – 1pm Breakfast/lunch/advice/activities
JustLife 10am – 12pm Meal & activities (Openshaw Centre, Ashton Old Road)
Reach Out To The Community 10am – 4pm Shop open. Food parcels & support
Mustard Tree 10am – 4pm Furniture, clothes, food club & food parcels
Cornerstones 10.30am – 3.30pm Hot food & drinks, shower & clothing
Urban Village 2.30pm – 4.30pm GP, nurse, drug worker and wound care clinic
Mustard Tree 5pm – 8.30pm Hot meal, advice, clothing
Coffee4Craig 7pm – 9pm Food, showers, advice & support

Sat 29th Dec

Lifeshare 7am – 2pm Food, entertainment, clothing, bedding, toiletries, medical care
Reach Out To The Community 10am – 4pm Shop open. Food parcels & support
Mustard Tree 10am – 4pm Furniture, clothes, food club & food parcels
Coffee4Craig 5pm – 7pm Food, showers, advice & support

Sun 30th Dec

Lifeshare 7am – 9am Breakfast
Food4All 4pm – 6pm Sunday roast, (veg & vegan options)
Coffee4Craig 5pm – 7pm Food, showers, advice & support

Mon 31st Dec

Booth Centre 9am – 1pm Breakfast/lunch/advice/activities
JustLife 10am – 12pm Meal & activities (Openshaw Centre, Ashton Old Road)
Barnabus (Support Office) 10am – 1pm Accommodation. Advice
Reach Out To The Community 10am – 4pm Shop open. Food parcels & support
Mustard Tree 10am – 4pm Furniture, clothes, food club & food parcels
Cornerstones 10.30am – 3pm Hot food & drinks, shower & clothing
Barnabus (Beacon) 10.30am – 1pm Breakfast, showers, clothing, lunch
Urban Village 2.30pm – 4.30pm GP, nurse, drug worker and wound care clinic
Coffee4Craig 7pm – 9pm Food, showers, advice & support

Tues 1st Jan

Cornerstones 10.30am – 3pm Hot food & drinks, shower & clothing
Barnabus (Beacon) 11am – 2pm Lunch, showers, clothing
Coffee4Craig 7pm – 9pm Food, showers, advice & support

Contact Details

Barnabus, (Beacon) 45 Bloom Street, M1 3LY 0161 237 3223
Barnabus, (Support Office) 61 Bloom Street, M1 3LY
Booth Centre, Pimblett Street, M3 1FU 0161 835 2499
Centrepoint, 52 Oldham St, M4 1LE 0161 228 7654
Coffee4Craig, 52 Oldham Street, M2 4LQ 07973955003
Cornerstones, 104b Denmark Road, M15 6JS 0161 232 8888
Food4All, Church of the Apostles, Miles Platting, M40 7FY
JustLife, Ashton Old Road M11 1HH 0161 285 5888
Lifeshare, 42 Dantzic Street, M4 4DN 0161 235 0744
MASH, 94 – 96 Fairfield St, M1 2WR 0161 273 4555
Men’s Room, 113 Fairfield Street, M12 6EL 0161 834 1827
Mustard Tree, 110 Oldham Road, Ancoats, M4 6AG 0161 850 2282
Reach Out TTC, 488 Wilbraham Rd, M21 9AS 0161 862 9415
Urban Village, Old Mill St, M4 6EE 0161 272 5656

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Better Buses for GM

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Our Buses in Greater Manchester aren’t working

Article written for GMPA by Pascale Robinson

Right now, bus operators can’t be forced to run any service, and they set the fares, but in the next year, we have a huge opportunity to change this wild west scenario.

Greater Manchester Mayor Andy Burnham is deciding now whether to pick a better way of running the bus network, re-regulating it, which puts buses back into public control.

37% of Greater Manchester’s job seekers said that lack of access to transport is a key barrier to getting work, backed up by JRF research in low-income neighbourhoods in Manchester. This is in one of the UK’s biggest and best city regions.

Better Buses campaign for GM Poverty Action

Taking the campaign on to the buses

People from the poorest fifth of households catch nearly 10 times as many buses as trains. For lots of us, without a bus we’re stuck. Across Greater Manchester, many reported that cars and trains are simply out the question in terms of price. However, with buses their last option, they highlighted how expensive fares and unreliable services prevent them from taking up positions, and how the un-joined network can mean commutes of over three hours a day (over Jobcentre Plus’ limit for reasonable travel).

Our bus network is not serving us. Instead people are being locked out of opportunities for work. With re-regulation, or franchising as it’s known, a fully integrated and planned network across GM’s 10 local authorities could connect us to our work places, our loved ones and the services we need at affordable fares, as we see in London.

What does this mean? Re-regulation means companies are told by local authorities what services to run, when, and how to set the fares. It also means local authorities can:

  • Plan and expand the network – Profits from busy routes could subsidise less busy but needed services. Right  now, bus companies cherry pick only profitable routes and make a killing, but local authorities could use profits to give everyone a better service.
  • Make buses affordable – Income could be used to lower fares, which have increased 55% above inflation in the last ten years.
  • Make buses reliable – Bus companies would have to share data – meaning buses don’t disappear from the time table or app.
  • Make buses frequent – Income could also be used to provide evening and weekend services, like we had before.

This would transform buses for a lot of us. Re-regulating in GM would set a precedent across the UK for a bus network that serves people, not profit. We’ve launched a petition calling for re-regulation and it already has over 5,000 signatures, but we want twice as many so please sign and share the petition to join the call for better buses.

Right now, we have a postcode lottery and a poverty premium, with richer areas often getting the better routes and cheaper fares, at least during commuter hours. Public money is used wherever possible, to plug gaps where there is need, however this is an inefficient use of public money. Better Buses for Greater Manchester found that on average £18 million a year is going to shareholder pay outs in the North West region.

Pascale Robinson Better Buses campagin for GM Poverty Action

Pascale Robinson

Re-regulating our bus network would mean that Greater Manchester could have publicly controlled buses which connect communities to where they need to be.

Join the campaign by signing the petition now: www.betterbusesgm.org.uk

We’d also love to hear from you. We need organisations, businesses and groups to pledge their support for the campaign. Whether you can offer your logo to show support, as GMPA have, or your time, or both, we need as many people speaking out for better buses as possible.

To find out more about the campaign, please say hello at Pascale@betterbusesgm.org.uk

 

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Hidden young people

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New research explores why young unemployed people are turning their backs on the benefit system
by Dr Katy Jones, University of Salford

There is growing concern about so-called ‘hidden young people’ – those young people who are neither in employment, education or training, nor claiming the benefits they are entitled to. There are approximately 21,890 hidden young people in Greater Manchester. Recognising the issue, Greater Manchester Combined Authority (GMCA), in its strategy ‘Our People, Our Place’, commits to ‘ensuring that fewer young people are ‘hidden’ from the essential support and services they need’. However, the evidence base relating to this group is incredibly limited – this is the case both locally and nationally.

In response to this, and as part of the Salford Anti-Poverty Taskforce, Salford City Council commissioned researchers at the University of Salford to undertake a qualitative study exploring the experiences of ‘hidden young people’. From interviews with 14 young people with experience of being both ‘not in employment, education or training’ and ‘Hidden’, and a series of focus groups involving 25 stakeholders from across the city, this research has uncovered some of the stories behind the statistics – and a range of reasons why many young people are shunning the benefits system.

The research shows that a lack of knowledge about benefit entitlements is widespread. As one young woman explained:

            “I didn’t know that I could claim… until I was told by the people from [accommodation provider]… If not, I
wouldn’t have known. You hardly hear it from anywhere, these things.”

Others are deterred by the ‘stigma’ associated with the Jobcentre. In the words of one young person:

            “Like if someone said to me, ‘Where do you get your money from?’ I think I’d be a bit embarrassed to tell
them.”

However for others, an increasingly ‘conditional’ welfare system, combined with poor experiences of the Jobcentre, made them reluctant to engage with the benefits system. As one stakeholder explained:

            “Why would you continue to engage with a system that treats you so overtly badly and has all the power in
that situation? You would just withdraw from it.”

Negative perceptions of Jobcentre Plus services were widespread amongst both young people and practitioners involved in the research.

Whether or not young people need or want to claim benefits, not engaging with the social security system excludes them from mainstream support and service provision – as most youth unemployment interventions are routed through the Jobcentre and related contracted providers.

Katy Jones Hidden young people article for GM Poverty Action

Dr Katy Jones

The report makes a series of recommendations for policy and practice, some of which apply at a Greater Manchester level – namely – that the GMCA should continue to monitor the issue, updating and measuring progress in meeting its strategic commitment against the estimated number of hidden young people in the sub-region (currently 21,890). Furthermore, in line with its commitment in the Greater Manchester strategy, we call on the GMCA to outline the steps it is taking to ensure effective support is provided to all hidden young people across Greater Manchester.

The report was launched at the University of Salford on 31st October, with a presentation from lead author Dr Katy Jones, followed by a response from Salford City Mayor Paul Dennett, and representatives from Salford City Council, Greater Manchester Combined Authority and the Greater Manchester Talent Match Youth Panel. A copy of the report can be accessed here.

 

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Enabling Homes

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Article by Katie Wightman of Enabling Homes

Enabling Homes logo for GM Poverty Action articleEveryone has a basic human right to a safe, secure and stable home environment, yet the UK government has failed to ensure the right to adequate housing. With an acute shortage of housing, particularly social and affordable housing, lack of housing security, overcrowding, evictions and homelessness, Enabling Homes is attempting to offer a solution to the current housing crisis, particularly for those in need of special care, support, or protection because of age, disability, or risk of abuse or neglect i.e. those individuals who are ‘vulnerable’.

When it comes to vulnerable individuals and their families, one of the biggest challenges will likely be the ability to access quality accommodation, accommodation which is fit for purpose and ideal for vulnerable clients.

Enabling Homes brings specialist Housing Associations, Government Funding and Care Providers together coordinating these programmes so that Charities or voluntary organisations supporting vulnerable client groups can have immediate access to these places to live, enabling Service Users to get the home they deserve and Care Providers to get under way with their contracts.  This is usually at no cost to the Care Provider at all.

In December 2015 Enabling Homes was founded with the main objective of purchasing suitable living accommodation within community settings for vulnerable adults within the care sector. Most of those individuals we have sourced housing for require support with issues such as mental health issues, learning difficulties, substance misuse, domestic violence, homelessness and daily living independence skills. We are based in the North West of England, but we have acquired properties in the North East and Midlands as well as parts of Wales.

Enabling Homes has developed good working relationships with various charitable housing associations as well as care providers throughout the UK and listens to the needs and requirements of each service. We will research and purchase buildings to create a suitable living environment. Generally, the buildings purchased are developed into self-contained apartments, normally somewhere in the region of 8 – 18 flats, however this can vary dependent on the requirements of the service. Previously we have renovated old unused buildings, such as churches, pubs, shops, old flats and even produced some new builds, to create a high standard of living accommodation that a resident can be proud of, and ultimately benefit from.

We are taking this opportunity to reach out to you as we are passionate about obtaining and developing properties for all individuals who may require some level of support. We are confident, and would be extremely proud, to work with care providers to purchase suitable accommodation for your service. We are more than happy to work alongside any existing partnerships you may have, however we can use our network of charitable housing
associations and/or care providers if needed.

Could you take some time to discuss with us the potential opportunities we could provide? We are happy to present our portfolio and explain in more detail what we can offer. The charitable housing association will be able to provide tenancy support and all apartments provided come fully furnished to a high standard.

Thank you for taking the time to read this, if you wish to contact us to discuss any of the information contained within this article, please do not hesitate to contact us by email For more information please visit our website

 

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Social Investment Fund

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Trafford Housing Trust invests £1m to tackle poverty

Trafford Housing Trust has just celebrated the first year of their new Social Investment Fund (SIF) which aims to reduce poverty and inequality in the borough. The Trust’s Social Investment Team and Board were joined by a range of colleagues, stakeholders and some of the organisations who’ve received support from the team.

Held at the Trust’s flagship health and wellbeing hub – Limelight, the event was a chance to recognise the people who dedicate their time and effort to help others and marked the achievements of the first year of the Social Investment Fund and looked to the work ahead.

Chair of the Social Investment Board – Steve Hughes, talked through aims of the SIF which are based on a ‘5-step plan’ produced by the Joseph Rowntree Foundation study – ‘We can solve poverty in the UK’. By offering a mix of micro, mid-sized and large grants and capacity building support the SIF aims to support existing organisations and new projects in Trafford to:

  • Strengthen families and communities
  • Boost incomes and reduce costs
  • Improve education standards and raise skills
  • Promote long-term economic growth benefitting everyone.

Since its launch in September 2017, the SIF has awarded 109 grants totalling £1,101,836 (estimated to benefit over 90,000 people) and capacity building support to local groups such as:

  • The Golden Centre of Opportunities who work with the Somali Community providing employment and skills support. You can find out how this vital support has helped them in this video
  • The Cyril Flint Befriending Service who provide support and companionship for people living on their own which you can see in this moving video

The day highlighted how well the Social Investment Team are thought of by the people they support which is apparent from the great feedback received on the day:

“Huge thanks to you and all the team. Wish all funders understood ‘life on the ground’ as well as you do.”

“We had a great evening, it was lovely to speak to people and chat about what we do.  The evening was very inspiring and I think what you are all doing is amazing.”

“Really impressed with the work that THT are doing in Trafford. It would be great to share your good practise across GM.”

Trafford Housing Trust article for GM Poverty Action

Trafford Housing Trust’s Social Investment Team with Chair of the Social Investment Board – Steve Hughes

Manager of the Social Investment Team – Tom Wilde says: “It was fantastic to have so many people join us to celebrate one year of the Social Investment Service.  We have committed over £1m in grant funding since launching 12 months ago, supporting over 100 projects which provide a range of much needed services for people across Trafford, including THT’s customers.  We also have a strong pipeline of projects coming through, and expect to be investing even more than this next year! The success of the event and the feedback we have already received is a credit to the whole team and the excellent work they do.

If you know anyone who may be able to help reduce poverty and inequality in Trafford point them in the direction of the social investment website

You can follow the work of the team, and the organisations they support, on social media on Facebook or Twitter

 

 

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Cost of a child 2018

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CPAG’s 2018 Cost of a Child report shows what it costs to raise a child to age 18, based on what the public thinks is a minimum standard of living.

The overall cost of a child (including rent and childcare) is £150,753 for a couple and £183,335 for a lone parent.

A combination of rising prices, benefits and tax credits freezes, the benefit cap and two-child limit, cuts to housing benefits, bedroom tax and the rolling out of universal credit have hit family budgets hard. Life has been getting progressively tougher for families on low or modest incomes over the past ten years, with families on in-work and out-of-work benefits hardest hit.

Even families with two parents currently working full time on the ‘national living wage’ are 11% (£49 per week) short of the income the public defines as an acceptable, no-frills living standard.  For lone parents, even with a reasonably paid job (on median earnings) will be 15% (£56 per week) short of an adequate income because of the high cost of childcare.

Many families – both in and out of work – get support from the social security system to help free them from the worst effects of poverty. Next year universal credit will be rolled out to everyone claiming one or more of the benefits it will replace. But the way the government plans to do this risks increasing hardship.

For a start, the way the government wants the 3 million people affected to move onto universal credit puts all the risk on to the shoulders of claimants – many of whom are vulnerable.

CPAG are asking MPs to persuade the government to change their plans. You can help by writing to your MP.

CPAG have proposed an alternative system which puts the needs of claimants at the heart of the process, and greatly reduces the risk of families facing destitution. You can help them make the case for this approach by asking your MP to push for changes. MPs will have chance to debate these rules and vote on them, but they can’t make changes once they’ve reached parliament. So the time to act is now.

Half of all children in the UK live in families who will receive universal credit when the rollout is complete. Can we ensure that these children don’t face hardship in the process of moving on to universal credit?

The full CPAG Cost of a Child 2018 report is available on their website

 

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Filling the vacuum

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The need for local child poverty strategies

On Friday October 26th, 2018 from 1.30pm – 3.30pm at Kelloggs, Orange Tower, Media City UK, Salford M50 2HF

There is currently a sizeable policy vacuum in respect of tackling family poverty in the UK. The UK government no longer has a child poverty strategy in place. The 2020 child poverty targets and the requirement on councils to have local poverty strategies were both scrapped by the Coalition Government.

With child poverty currently increasing and expected to reach 5.2 million by 2022, urgent action is needed locally to mitigate the impact of central government policy.  Local authorities and their partners in different parts of the country have begun filling this vacuum through the implementation of child or family poverty strategies and initiatives such as poverty truth commissions.

In Scotland, the Scottish Government has introduced its own child poverty reduction targets and is asking local authorities to create Child Poverty Action Plans.

At this event we will discuss how we can ensure Greater Manchester is at the forefront of tackling family poverty.  We will also explore how we can work together across public, private and VCSE sectors to ensure that all parts of the city region have comprehensive poverty strategies in place.

Speakers:
Graham Whitham, Greater Manchester Poverty Action;
Louisa McGeehan, Child Poverty Action Group;
Angela Harrington, Manchester City Council;
Lisa Nandy, Member of Parliament for Wigan (pictured above);
Andrew Lightfoot, Greater Manchester Combined Authority;
John McKendrick, The Scottish Poverty and Inequality Unit

Places are limited so please book

 

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Your Local Pantry

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“It’s more than just a full tummy, it’s a massive link in the community”
Stockport Homes Pantry article for GM Poverty Action

Stockport Homes opened the doors to its first pantry in 2014. This was a time of welfare reform and the surge in food bank vouchers allocated in Stockport made it apparent that there needed to be another option available, one that would help and support people before they reached crisis point.  It was hoped that the pantry model could help relieve financial pressure in people’s lives, and be a sustainable resource that would bring communities together.

Stockport Homes Pantry article for GM Poverty Action The pantry is a volunteer led, community food resource with local residents signing up as members and paying a small weekly subscription fee (£3.50 in Stockport). In return for this, members can visit the pantry once a week and select their own items from a wide variety of goods. This includes chilled, frozen, dairy, fresh meat and fish, fresh fruit and veg and all the usual store cupboard favourites. These items are often worth in excess of £15.00 at retail value.

The ethos of the pantry is to offer dignity and choice:
•  Offers a hand up not a hand down – we are not a foodbank or crisis provision, we aim to prevent people from reaching this point.

•  Provide access to holistic, wrap around support linked to areas such as money advice, housing, health and employment and skills

•  Community led – members and volunteers keep our shelves stocked and our pantries open and as such must be at the heart of pantry development empowering themselves and their local communities by co-running their own Pantries.

•  The volunteer scheme supports people back in to paid employment

Stockport Homes Pantry article for GM Poverty Action

Stockport Homes Brinnington Pantry.

All money raised is reinvested straight back in to the project, paying for the day-to-day costs as well as raising a small surplus. This surplus allows the pantry to buy additional stock and essential equipment where required. The majority of our stock comes from FareShare, a national charity who redistribute surplus stock from large supermarkets and food manufacturers to projects like ourselves.

As at September 2018, four pantries were open in Stockport, with a further one scheduled before the end of the financial year.

The pantry network has a significant impact on local communities, with 9266 individual visits to the four pantries in 2017/2018 generating a collective saving of £115,825.

Its 25-30 strong group of volunteers from the local community and Stockport Homes’ staff have donated 4,735 hours during 2017-2018, covering everything from the cash office, supporting customers with their pantry shopping, behind the scenes administration and receiving/sorting deliveries.

Many other social landlords and community groups are now interested in replicating our model through the Your Local Pantry social franchise. Over 30 pantry style schemes are now operating in Greater Manchester with many more coming on board from across the UK.

The package includes help and support setting up from a dedicated officer, bespoke software, volunteer hand book and a full operations guide. To find out more about this exciting opportunity contact Anna Jones  0161 474 4760

Church Action on Poverty (CAP) manage the social franchise on behalf of Stockport Homes, to help people to set up community cooperative food stores nationwide. To discuss what is included in the package of support and costs, please contact CAP via laura@church-poverty.org.uk or telephone 0161 872-9294.

For more information about all food providers across Greater Manchester please visit GMPA’s map.

 

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Hidden young people in Salford – a new research project

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Since the mid-2000s, increasing numbers of young people have been struggling to make a successful transition from full-time education into work or further training opportunities. Whilst in recent years the numbers of young people who are not in employment, education or training (NEETs) has been decreasing following a peak in the aftermath of the financial crisis, the number of young people impacted remains a major concern.

But whilst there is a growing body of research focusing on NEETs, there is increasing concern about so-called ‘Hidden NEETs’ – those young people who are neither in employment, education or training nor in contact with mainstream welfare services. Suggested possible reasons for being ‘hidden’ include the stigma associated with benefit receipt, experience of benefit ‘sanctions’, being able to rely on financial support from family, engagement in crime and participating in the informal economy.  However the evidence base on this is incredibly weak.

To address this evidence gap, the University of Salford, as part of the Salford Anti-Poverty Taskforce, has been commissioned by Salford City Council to explore this issue.

We are currently trying to find young people (aged 18 – 24) who are living in Salford, not in employment, education or training (NEET), and not claiming the benefits they are entitled to. They will be invited to take part in a short, confidential interview about their experiences and all will receive a £10 shopping voucher as a thank you for their time.  If you or your organisation are aware of any such individuals, or might be able to help us to find them, please contact Katy Jones by email or call 0161 295 7030.

Hidden young people in Salford for GM Poverty Action

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